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Autumn Moss Control

Soluble Iron - The Lawn Shop 2012If you have braved it out in your garden over the past few weekends to clear up the leaves from the lawn, you may have noticed moss plants appearing in your lawn.  If it was mossy all summer then you really need to control it now!

Many a lawn treatment company insist on only treating moss in the autumn months and never the spring months too as the grasses start to grow. If you have moss in your lawn, why not try and get control of it or at least retard it whilst there is some turf grass growth happening.  It is becoming too late to scarify the lawn as there is a slim change of grass seed germination and natural recovery following this mechanical task.

Traditional lawn owners will instantly think of applying Lawn Sand, a blend of Iron Sulphate, Sulphate of Ammonia and Kiln Dried Sand. It is usually applied at a high rate of 140 grams per square metre and most if the product is sand - almost 70%.

The Sulphate of Ammonia in the product will provide a rush of growth from the 21% Nitrogen and the Soluble Iron some colour and moss darkening and killing. Soluble Iron is a wet sugar like product that easily goes into solution, especially if using a little tepid water to mix it up before pouring it into your Knapsack Sprayer.  Dependent upon the strength of the Soluble Iron (the percentage of Iron in it) you should aim to use around 1.2 to 1.5 Kg per 15 Litres of spray solution across an areas of approx 500 - 750 square metres dependent upon the calibration of your Knapsack Sprayer. At this dose rate, you will get a rapid greening up of the grass and also the moss will be retarded by turning black, drying out and dying. Leave the lawn for two weeks following treatment with moss killer to ensure the moss is dead before scarifying it out. Do not forget to aerate the lawn and then fertilise it with an anutumn and winter fertiliser or a spring summer at half dose rate.

If you lawn has lots of moss in it, you will never grow any grass amongst unless you are cruel to be kind - kill the moss off totally and then renovate your lawn in the spring. Soluble Iron may be applied monthly over the lawn at half the moss dose rate to keep the lawn looking nice and green and if you spot some moss creeping in, up the rate to blacken it off. If your lawn has dense healthy grasses in it, the moss will not get a look in and moss is mostly an indicator telling you that your lawn's condition is poor or it is struggling to grow in the area you are expecting it to such as in dense shade, north facing and under fence lines and hedges.

Soluble Iron - little and often is the best advice to keep a check on moss in your lawn over the late autumn and winter months to prevent it getting a hold when your back is turned!  Soluble Iron will also turn your turf grasses a great dark green colour and lift the visual of the garden this autumn.

Related Topics -

Buy Soluble Iron for Moss Control

Controlling Moss in Lawns

Scarifying

Lawn Shop

Lawn Fertilizer

 

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